#308: How to Use ‘Though’ in English [+ FREE Worksheet]

Apr 10, 2024 | Free Resource, Grammar

Have you ever been in an English conversation and felt frustrated over the difference between ‘though,’ ‘although,’ and ‘even though?’ Or have you wondered where ‘though’ fits in a sentence? 

  • Though
  • Even though
  • Although 
  • As though

These words often create frustration. You might feel unsure about the differences in meaning. Can they be used interchangeably?

And where do you put them in the sentence? At the beginning? In the middle? 

Mastering these connectors elevates your English; they’re the keys to expressing contrast with elegance, for example. They help speakers acknowledge opposing points of view or exceptions, which is essential for nuanced and balanced discussions.

Moreover, these words often appear in idiomatic expressions, movies, literature, and daily conversations. Understanding and using them correctly can deepen cultural appreciation and improve comprehension of English media and texts.

So if you’ve ever struggled with ‘though’ ‘even though’ ‘although’ and ‘as though’, this lesson is going to remove any doubts. 

We’re going to dive deep into the nuances of these versatile connectors. I’ll clarify when and how to use each one, tackle the most common challenges head-on with practical examples, and share tips to avoid common pitfalls so you can use these words with confidence.

How to Use ‘Though’ in English | PLUS Although, Even Though, and As Though

Category #1: Though

Unlike words or phrases with ‘though,’ on its own, ‘though’ can be placed at the beginning, the middle, or even the end of a sentence. 

  • Though she left home early, she arrived late for the interview. 
  • She arrived late to the interview, though she left home early. 
  • She left home early. She arrived late to the interview, though

To understand and decide where to place it in the sentence, we need to consider the meaning of though in context. 

 

Use #1: Though to Mean Despite

‘Though’ is often used to mean despite the fact that something is or occurs.

When used in this way, ‘though’ is often placed at the beginning or middle of a sentence to introduce the two contrasting statements or facts.

  • Lily was fond of her brother, though he did everything to annoy her.
  • Lily was fond of her brother, despite the fact that he did everything to annoy her. 
  • Though I try to limit my coffee intake, I’ve had about 3 cups today.  
  • Despite the fact that I try to limit my coffee intake, I’ve had about 3 cups today. 

    Use #2: Though to Mean However or But

    English speakers also use ‘though’ in place of ‘however’ or ‘but’ to weaken or soften the previous statement, often with an opinion.

    To do this, ‘though’ is often placed in the middle or, sometimes, at the end of a sentence.

    • The vacation request will likely be denied, though it’s still worth asking.
    • The vacation request will likely be denied, but it’s still worth asking.

    • Wendy said she’ll be here in 30 minutes, though I’m unsure with all this traffic.
    • Wendy said she’ll be here in 30 minutes, however I’m unsure with all this traffic.

    • She called me yesterday and it was a brief conversation. I don’t remember what we talked about though.
    • She called me yesterday and it was a brief conversation. I don’t remember what we talked about however.

    Use #3: Though to Mean Nonetheless or Anyway

    Finally, native speakers use ‘though’ at the end of a sentence to mean regardless, nonetheless, or any way. 

      • Would you like a ride to the airport?
        I’ve already booked my Uber; thanks, though!
      • I can take on a few of your tasks if you’d like.
        I’m almost done; thank you, though.

    Category #2: Although

    ‘Although’ may be used interchangeably with ‘though,’ however, there are three distinctions to keep in mind. 

    1. It’s considered a more formal choice. 
    2. It’s used to introduce a surprising contrast. 

     

    Use #1: Although to Mean Though

    As mentioned, ‘although’ is the more formal choice and can be used interchangeably with ‘though’ to contrast and mean that something is or occurs in spite of another. 

    As a result, it can also be used to replace contrast words such as but and however.

    ‘Though’ is a shortened informal version of ‘although.’

    However, ‘although’ is used as a conjunction and may only be placed at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence. 

    • Although many of the team members were on vacation, the product launched without any issues.
    • Olivia came to the party, although she didn’t stay long.  
    • I knew it was the wrong decision, although I didn’t say anything in the moment. 

    Use #2: Although for Surprise

    We also use ‘although’ to emphasize that the contrasting statement is a surprise or unexpected. 

    • Although the weather forecast said we’d have full sun all day, it started to rain in the afternoon.
    • I took piano lessons for years, although I can’t remember the musical scale now. 

    The company went ahead with terminating the contract, although the board members were on the fence.

    Category #3: Even Though

    English speakers use ‘even though’ specifically to create a stronger contrast between an expectation and a result. 

    And it is the strongest version among the though, although, and even though. This means we use in sentences to express surprising outcomes or contrasts. 

    Like although, this phrase is only used at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence. 

    • Even though Jessica was severely ill, she worked hard to meet her deadline. 
    • The news channel continued to misrepresent ethnic groups even though the public had a strong reaction. 
    • Even though she was nervous about the presentation, she spoke with confidence and clarity.

    Category #4: As Though

    And now, let’s get to ‘as though’ — the odd one out in this group.

    Unlike the previous words, ‘as though’ is used to make a comparison in place of ‘like’ or ‘as if.’

    Use #1: ‘As Though’ for Descriptions

    In some cases, we can use ‘as though’ to help us clearly describe a situation through comparison or provide a more vivid explanation. 

    • The sky appeared dark and gloomy, as though it was going to rain. 
    • The entire family celebrated as though they had won the lottery. 

     

    Use #2: ‘As Though’ for Hypothetical or Impossible Situations

    English speakers also use ‘as though’ to highlight something hypothetical or emphasize that something seems to be the case, even though it may not be.

    • The colorful houses looked as though children had designed them. 
    • Why is her voice so shaky? She sounds as though she’s never given a speech before.
    • It’s so hot outside. Peter just came into the office and he looks as though he just ran a marathon!

    FREE Worksheet: Practice Using ‘Though’

    Master the use of these connectors with a FREE downloadable worksheet.

    You can download the FREE Practice Using Though Worksheet with the form below the video lesson.

    And if you have questions or would like to share your own example sentences using these word pairs, you can share them directly with me in the comments below.

    ~ Annemarie

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